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account deficits, we're not shipping as much joe seas? >> when people think of the economic situations, they think of the u.s. but what it will do, it will cut into the u.s. deficit and it will cut into the chinese surplus. and you ask the average economist for the last three or four years before the crisis, during the crisis, after the crisis, what's the global economic problem, number one, the answer probably isn't microimbalances. trade surplus in the u.s., trade surplus and china. what i didn't know is that still more than half of the u.s. deficit of goods and services is energy imports. >> and that's going to go away? >> as things are going, that might be going away. at the same time, china surplus will suffer from the tracing of independence of china. >> that's strong dollar weak yuan. becky. >> just an observation. >> first, tight oil, i haven't heard of this before. i know where the marcellus shale fields are. where is tight oil? is it in the same sort of locations? >> same. traditionally, coming out of gas yields because of this huge different between gas and oil prices. which
up by the fed money printing. our deficit is as well as it makings it cheaper for poll tish shuns to borrow. former representative ron paul says why the fed is addicted to the this. you don't want to miss ron paul coming up. lauren: despite the cyprus scare, our next guest says they offer good investments. he will tell you which ones to buy. his answers certainly surprised me. lauren: time for a quick speed read of some of the day's other headlines. five stories, one minute of the first up, general motors recalling 34,000 vehicles to fix transmissions. recall affects 2013 buick lacrosse and cadillac srx crossover models. >>> u.s. crude oil production set to pass imports for the first time in 18 years. the gap between monthly oil production and imports is projected to be nearly two million barrels per day by 2014. >>> neiman marcus settles with the federal trade commission after claiming its products were made with faux fur when they contained real fur. it prohibits the retailer from violating those laws for 20 years. >>> total number of mortgage applications subpoena applied for i
-point deficit and it tied the game at 69. under two minutes left. clie born drives and makes the bucket. they call the offensive foul. questionable call by the officials. iowa state cannot believe it. instead of a four-point lead it is tied at 75. and then .20 of a second left. the three and are you kidding me? ohio state is on to the sweet 16 for a school record fourth straight year. they will face arizona. second seed miami and illinois. the illini taking advantage of the lack of defense. right to the hoop and late in the game and tied at 52. one hand and jam. it is easy for the illini. down one and a minute left and larkin with the step back three. got it. miami to the sweet 16. they will face market. 63-59 the final. don't see a 12 and 13-seed very often. 6 seconds left and tied at 74. garland banks it in and la salle up 2. ole miss inbounds the ball and from half court for the win and no way. la salle moving on to the sweet 16 for the first time since 1955. 76-74 the final. we will take a brief timeout before we check in on the stanford women. and the good old boys of nascar can't
trillion in debt. we have deficits we can't even wrap our arms around, and they want more of your money. if you were a financial advisor that put you $1 million in debt and ripped through your college savings for your children and all of your checking account and said, just give me more money and we'll solve the problem, would you do it? absolutely not. more than jobs, though, we are also working to save medicare and social security, the commitments that we have made to the american people. so let's take a look here at the big picture. here's a budget breakdown of where we are at right now. look, your eyes are glazed over and we start talking about the trillions of dollars that we spend, but let's take a look at what you pay versus what you expect. this big blue part right here? that's on auto pilot. no adults have come to the table to talk about where we are at today and how to actually save your social security and medicare and medicaid in this big blue part. we are doing that today. house republicans in balancing the budget. but this is what you expect from the federal government. yo
, this is all washington talks abou about, which is deficits and budgets. and you could argue that, in terms of the goalposts, we're arguing in and around the rand paul budget or paul ryan budget. and there was very little news of the house caucus budget. which should be the flag around which democrats rally, given the stream opposition. >> the progressive caucus budget is the most responsible budget that's been presented. i think even more than patty murray's budget. the senate democratic budget. but you're right. it doesn't get attention, because inside the beltway, the fixation is on deficit reduction, and that's by conservatives who somehow buy the idea that government is going to crush us if we don't drastically cut now. i don't think they want to kus as much as rand paul wants to cut. and you were right to highlight that part of his budget, increasing the retirement age and privatizing medicare, because i think that's the part of his budget that's going to really crash his 2016 hopes. but to get back to 2014, you know, it's going to be up to obama, particularly, to lead the charge. he'
what that means. neil: i think it's a deficit. >> no, it's 17 times our debt. pretty close there. neil: i was talking to charlie rangel earlier on this issue, and he more or less tried to make fun of the notion of imujts themselves, whether they are on time or late, regardless, you know, no one really sticks to them, and actually in truth, he's right about that, but he duds make a mockery of the process, not only when you propose budgets late, and other presidents who have done this before. he's developed into an art form, obviously, but when you don't stick to them in the thing, and you blow them away by spending far more than is allocated in them. what do you think of this in >> well, i think submitting a budget's important besides the fact it's required by law because it's the blueprint for where we go forward fiscally, and you have to abide by the law. what congress is doing between the ryan budget and murray budget, we're going nowhere fast, and essentially, the question is is president obama going to put forth a budget, stick his neck out, modernize entitlements? guess what, if n
, second seed ohio state and 10th seed iowa state. the 13-point deficit and it tied the game at 69. under two minutes left. clie born drives and makes the bucket. they call the offensive foul. questionable call by the officials. iowa state cannot believe it. instead of a four-point lead it is tied at 75. and then .20 of a second left. the three and are you kidding me? ohio state is on to the sweet 16 for a school record fourth straight year. they will face arizona. second seed miami and illinois. the illini taking advantage of the lack of defense. right to the hoop and late in the game and tied at 52. one hand and jam. it is easy for the illini. down one and a minute left and larkin with the step back three. got it. miami to the sweet 16. they will face market. 63-59 the final. don't see a 12 and 13-seed very often. 6 seconds left and tied at 74. garland banks it in and la salle up 2. ole miss inbounds the ball and from half court for the win and no way. la salle moving on to the sweet 16 for the first time since 1955. 76-74 the final. we will take a brief timeout before we check in on th
, taxes, spending and deficits. and the notion that they're going to somehow come together, there's really no, no, i guess, carrot for them to go after here. >> and then they go home for two weeks. >> sure. >> and the question is are they going to hear anything from their constituents that's going to move anybody. i don't know. >> i think that they're not. and the best chance that they had to potentially hear about it was with the potential for a government shutdown, which has now been averted. so again, back to this new pace rhine of these big debates over real issues that are kind of going nowhere. and a new baseline that incidentally it's interesting because their stopgap spending bill that was passed yesterday did mark something of a breakthrough in that the appropriators in the house and the senate, the bipartisan leaderships thereof were able to come together and come up with a spending plan that keeps the government solvent and keeps it operating. and so i think that now we are going to see the appropriators get, you know, being able to get together hopefully and work out these, you
, immigration and guns and what to do about the deficit. >> don't forget two other prominent spokes people, the president and vice president. they care a lot about it and have been quiet of late. i expect to see a big push between of two of them before the vote. >> the lack of courage in the united states is asstountounast. >> it's amazing. >> no one is coming to take your gun. no one is coming to take your gun. >> it's amazing. it's amazing. when you look at the fact that we are talking about a simple thing like background checks. people are dying every day. a baby killed in -- >> in pennsylvania. >> in brunswick, georgia. we are arguing about background checks is almost ununbelievable. surreal. >> background checks have 90% of support among the american people last check. >>> senator bob casey of pennsylvania will join us on the set coming up and leigh gallagher and representative rick mulvaney will weigh in. our good friend michael hainey will have a preview of the "gq" magazine. bill karins, what is up? >> schoolhouse are cancelled around baltimore and washington, d.c. a lot of delays.
you need to deal with it budgets and deficits and you need to keep growth going. here is what i saw over the weekend. recession in greece which is a actually a depression if you line it up against the u.s. great depression in 1929 it looks a lot a like in terms of how much unemployment there send a how much the economy was contracted. greece is having our great depression of the late 1920s. >> wow. >>> moving on to washington now. president obama's renewed push for a grand bargain may be showing some early signs of paying off, at least with one top republican. senator bob corker of tennessee says he could envision raising tax revenue if democrats embrace big changes to medicare and social security. he is at odds with other members of his party including house speaker john boehner who is ruling out the prospect of any new taxes. >> i think, by the way, there is a chance on a deal. i know the president is saying the right things and we have an opportunity over the next four to five months. i think republicans, if they saw true entitlement reform would be glad to look at tax reform tha
and also address the problems causing a long-run deficit which are healthcare rapidly growing healthcare costs. we can improve our tax code by closing all the tax loopholes that we have. that's what the president has been focused on since frankly since i started working for him back in 09. >> rose: do you believe, are you hopeful that somehow the capitol, the dinners the lunches that are taking place that there's somehow a change in the dynamic of the conversation? >> i think the president is willing to try whatever will work. i think that it's a pretty high hurdle he's facing. i say that because the president worked awfully hard because of the congressional leadership to reach a grand bargain. we set as a goal as a number of others have to rules the deficit by 4 trillion dollars over the next decade. we made substantial progress. two and-a-half million. we didn't reach a plan then because speaker boehner decided to go to plan b. if we couldn't get to the bargain then i don't know if it's any easier now. it's hard for me to say what has changed from their calculations. but the president
and yet we're still going to have a trillion dollars budget deficit. spending is the problem. >> the white house says in response, yes, it's true. taxes went up more than $600 billion over ten years at the end of the year but it is also true the white house put $1.5 trillion worth of spending cuts in their budget. the truth is you're both right. i mean, they have offered spending cuts. the taxes did go up. it still hasn't made enough of a dent. you still have to sit down and do something. >> right. i think we're doing our budget this year. actually we're doing it this week here in the house. our budget will balance in ten years. we're going to pass our budget. hopefully the senate will pass their budget. except their budget never comes to balance. the president's budget never comes to balance. you can't continue to spend money as far as the eye can see that you don't have. and that's what they're continuing to propose, along with higher taxes on the american people. >> but the political reality is, no budget deal can probably happen, not one that will seriously address the deficit without
the president a major deficit reduction victory or not? if they really believe that needs to be done and the president put something on the table that gets them significant entitlement reform and savings, i think they've got to do it. >> harold, i think the possibility of deals and immigration, possibility of deals on guns, possibility of deals on the budget, on the long-term debt, i think the possibilities are actually -- excuse me for being optimistic, pretty darn good on all fronts. you've got republicans who daily are holding press conferences wringing their hands trying to figure out how to save their party. and you have a president who, again, he's a 47%, pretty damn good considering everything. but still, he wants to be over 50% and he wants a legacy. he doesn't want to just talk about what he did the first two years. >> i agree. i believe the prospects for progress on both immigration and gun control are gun regulation. if we get progress on the budget and the debt. i think immigration and gun regulations are easier to win. if the economy hobbles along and don't get me wrong,
they trust on spending issues. when asked how our budget deficit should be reduced, a large majority, 65% of people said by cutting spending. when asked to choose between the budgets proposed by each party, most people pick the one more in line with the republican proposal. cutting spending and not raising taxes. but when asked when each party was trusted more, people say that they trust the democrats more. go figure. let's get an amp explanation from charlie hearst, economists at the washington times. so you have this. people seem to like the republican approach. they just don't like the republican label with it. why is that? >> i think a large degree, republicans have been snakepit. largely because of what we have seen over the last couple of years. republicans talking to the media, which is something the democrats have focused on more than anything else. including the ideas that republicans have gone four. voters are far more in line with those ideas. but i would actually argue that republicans least realize that there is a problem here and there is a real disconnect between washingto
billion deficit. they don't want to get to where stock toeupbs righ stockton is right now so they are under this emergency pherg, state control. a lot of people have scheduled a protest today, are being called for to protest this move. what exactly wha will he be responsible for? >> slicing and dicing. cutting salaries of city employees. detroit already has a high crime rate. you don't want what happened to stockton, just like matt said they have per capita more murders in the city of chicago. how is that possible, little stockton? if you look at the map in california everybody was moving out in san francisco, properties were too high there, same with palo at torques silicon valley, they moved to stockton. what could happen in detroit unless they start cutting more. if detroit has to file for chapter 9 bankruptcy municipal that would make headlines around the world and kind prus would be booted off the front page. >> that's what they are trying to do and -- >> the mayor and the city council loose all the authority they shr-fplt they've been trying and they can't do that. the
that are confident. they are at odds about the budget deficit. they believe the federal government should be required to balance the budget. and when asked to describe the national debt 68 percent said it is an immediate problem. 27 percent said it's something that can be handled in the future. only 4 percent said it's not a problem. >> reveal your weight or pay a penalty. cvs announcing all workers on company healthcare must have an annual wellness review and report their weight, body fat, blood pressure and more. if they don't they will be charged $600 more a year. people not only criticizing the penalty but also wondering this about worker's privacy. in a statement cvs said personal health information would remain private. so we want to know would you reveal this information? send us your comments at foxfriendsfirst@foxnews.com. >>> 9 minutes to the top of the hour. you are looking at president obama arriving at ramallah. this as a short time ago a rocket launched into southern israel. we have a live report from ramallah on the other side of the break. 15 of the 9-11 hijackers came from saudi arab
taxes, it would curb spending by repealing obama care and eliminate the deficit in ten years. $4.6 trillion in cuts. zero chance of passing in the democratic-controlled senate, it's dead on arrival. >> lawmakers in the house and senate approved legislation to fund the government through the end of september. that avoids the risk of a partial federal shutdown. in the process, they are on spring break for a couple weeks. what's your take on this? >> my take is the whole financial dysfunction of our congress is mind blow iing. you look at this week. let's say frederick, maryland, where there's air traffic control that will be shut. a tower that was built by the stimulus money. so stimulus money went into this tower. the government saying it's a priority. and the the government because of its dysfunction saying we have to shut is down. that's a perfect representation, i think, of how washington is not doing its job. we can't even pass a budget. it can't even run the books. there's no strategy. when you look at some of the spending cuts, you see a lack of a strategy in american financ
? >> sure, i do. one problem with the baseline is it brings the deficit later on of the we looked at the budget and realized we could probably balance in five years. the problem is with the way the numbers work is it brings you back out of balance soon thereafter. what we wanted to do is have a credible plan that got us to balancing, got us into surplus. that's what our budget does. there is something unique in the baseline where deficits go down to the mid part of the next ten years and then go right back up. what we want to do is get them on a downward path and keep them down. we not only balance the budget, we go into surpluses and pay off the debt. >> brian: here is chris van hollen. he seems to disagree with everything you say. here is an example. >> i'm used to that. >> let me focus first on what our budget focuses on, which is not just economic growth in jobs in the future, but jobs in economic growth now and in the future. this republican budget is not balanced in ten years. >> brian: is he right? is it not in balance? >> no, it does balance in ten years. they're throwing
, italy because they're all suffering and because of too much spending, too much debt, deficit is too high. all right, senator, congratulations on your big win. i know when you announce if you're running for president you'll do it hear? you want to make that promise? >> oh, yeah, we didn't already announce it. >> sean: no, i'm just checking. thank you, senator. >> all right. >> sean: appreciate it. and coming up on "hannity." >> i studied the constitution myself. i'm roonebly well-educated and i thank you for the lecture. >> i would note that she chose not to answer the question that i asked. >> the answer is obvious no. >> sean: well, she did need the lecture, left wing senator dianne feinstein says she felt, quote, patronized by that exchange simply because she was asked about the assault weapons ban. and ted cruz will join me to respond and later dr. benjamin carson brought down the house over at cpac and hinting that he may run for the white house. i'll ask him about that and much more. this is a jam-packed edition of "hannity." much more straight ahead. ♪ [ slap! ] [ male announcer
what's called video deficit when they watch the screen passively, they can't really assemble a coherent narrative about what's happening. the way our brains develop, we need some interaction, which a tablet actually supplies because you do something and you get a response for it. it's not a substitute for a loving care giver of some sort in your life, but at least it's responding. >> i do wonder, though, about attention spans. i have two kids, 6 and 10. i'm one of these brooklyn mommies that buys hand made wooden toys from germany andy courages the kids to read books. although when i need them to be quiet, i will hand them the kindle fire. and i do notice that they're a little more -- my son is a little more agitated after playing games on that. is there anything there to worry about really? >> let's start by saying your son's a boy. i'd say based on my experience -- and those who grew occupy without these devices is the same. it's true, all things in moderation, although as part of her expiration of the story, hannah kind of experimented on her own kid and let her youngest play as much
be in a deficit in 10 years the argument however is that the senate budget creates jobs and economic growth from the middle out. now, that's according to the author. senator pattie murray. for the democrats the vote is a really big accomplishment. >> first of all, over the last two decades the average budget resolution considered 78 amendments. we have done 101. the average vote arama 70 amendments. twice as many. doing this has been a her could herculessen feet. senator murray and senator sessions. >> during the vote senators were facing more than 500 amendments which were filed but 70 were voted on. of course when you do take a 13 hour six minute vote there has to be a little bit of humor. >> it is good to say that as -- as of this time, 5:00 a.m., there has not been a day without a budget being passed in the united states senate. >> and some interesting observations from the vote. all democrats voted yeah with the exception of for up for re-election 2014. unfriendly to democrats. mark beg gich from alaska. baucus from montana. pryor from arc. hagan from north carolina. recently passed the rya
as the chicago public school system faces a reported billion dollar deficit. alderman willie cochran's ward, constituents have been calling all day. >> some cases we are happy, in some cases we are not so happy. >> reporter: on the plus side, the district says the savings will allow major investments in surviving schools including adding 70 libraries, science labs, even air conditioning. for many it's not what's gained but what's lost and where. neighborhood schools in some of chicago's poorest communities. the decisions were based on low enrollment but others say race made a role. an outraged carrie austin, an alderman, told "the chicago tribune," quote, every time the whites go to screaming and hollering, they back off and steam roll over black and brown folks. not this time. and she's not the only one who believes that. you think it's the black communities that often are asked to sacrifice first? >> in this case, yes, i do. yes, i do. >> reporter: this is 70th street in the heart of the city's south side and this is the local elementary school. parents are proud of it. the sign up there
-income americans to reduce the deficit. so now, finally, senate democrats feel that they can go ahead and echo that position. that's change. >> an narc the president is expected to release the white house budget in april. what kind of compromises, if any, can we expect to see there? >> i think he is going to kind of come up and say the same things that he has been saying. we will look at the changes he will make to the entitlement program. the republicans saying they will not raise tax and what the democrats might do on entitlement reforms if they can find any kind of common ground that would be possible there. >> bill schneider, anna palmer, stick around. we would like to come back to you later in the hour, if that's okay with you. >> sure. >> thanks. >>> could bill clinton be talking out of both sides of his mouth? the report that suggests escorting two candidates for the same office. we will talk about that. >>> first though, kristen cinema is here, very excited about being here. we just had a 15-minute conversation to make up. we can't talk about that. we can talk immigration, marriage equ
's what counts. not if you happen to have a little deficit, and in fact michael steele went on to say when we were handing out checks i don't believe reince priebus complaining. >> so reince is just being silly. and i understand he wasn't complaining about debt and concerned about debt when i was write checks to wisconsin when he was chairman and he wanted to win the legislature and governor which they did and they were all on board about going into debt to win. >> when did republicans turn into democrats. it's all overshadowed and sabotaged by infighting. >> bill: this is the circular firing squad for which republicans are famous. grace nap ol 'tano will be with here today, neil king, and of course you'll be with us too throughout the morning, and mike i will bloomberg is on the warpath again. but first. >> announcer: this the "full court press." >> on this tuesday overhead lines making news michael jackson's family is suing the entertainment company that sponsored the last tour. tmz reports that -- >> 2011? >> bill: come. come on. >> -- the new lawsuit they ar
the rate. we say, let's take some of that revenue to help reduce the deficit, combined with other targeted cuts. >> be more specific for me. when you talk about tax loopholes and the very wealthy. which specific loopholes and what is very wealthy? >> sure, sure, these are, when you're in the highest tax bracket, you're in the 39% tax bracket when you get a deduction, whatever it may be for, you get 39 cents worth of deduction. whereas somebody who is in the 28% tax bracket only gets 28 cents deduction for that particular deduction. so what we're saying and this is similar to a proposal the president's put forward, is that for folks who are in that very high bracket, the 39% bracket, the value of your deductions will be limited to about 28% which is what the value of deductions is for a middle income taxpayer. >> so ultimately, the budget that you have there and i just read the little chunk of it, you have more revenue increases than cuts, right? >> within, within this particular budget, but if you look, soledad, at the two-year period of reduction we've been engaged in, which is -- include
to approximately 5 billion euros. because then all your financing are the government deficits. >> adam, thank you so much. >> my pleasure. >> becky, you highlight a really good point. what is very clear from this government and also from the people on the ground that i've spoken with is they absolutely don't want to see a reduction in the sides of the banking system here because they know that is what 50% of the economy and a ton of the jobs, as well. they realize it's going to be a change of livelihood. changes that will happen in this country no matter what are going to be startling to the people here. >> i saw all the headlines coming from russia and the president here making strong comments. is that going to fall on deaf ears in europe? is that not a big deal as far as they're concerned? >> that would be my interpretation, absolutely. would you agree with that, adam? whatever russia says is going to fall on deaf ears when it comes to the troika? >> it doesn't fall on deaf ears. but the europeans have made a categoric statements. cypress has to come up with 5.8 billion euros. it can't be throu
that the information exists, but the lack of a communication ability to translate that is a significant deficit. for highly uncommon event such as an asteroid flyby, there simply no established mutation mechanism that i believe our flight operations team learned of da 14 when they received a courtesy call from a colleague at the aerospace corporation. last year the commercials of the industry participate in deities shriek for war games. these games are held every other year and they're designed to exercise dvd thinking about the deployment of the terrestrial and space aspects in response to a complex situation. last of those games included as they have several times in the past that dod relies on commercial satellite company, their reliance is considerable and that a crisis is the wrong time to establish clear lines accumulation which a major partners and suppliers. i suspect the same conclusion can be safely applied to the topics we're discussing today. while governments were first to since i want to near earth space, commercial enterprise will be the primary user of the orbital arc in the 21s
, thankfully. >>> facing a $1 billion deficit, chicago public school system is making some really big changes. ceo barbara byrd bennett says the district's underutilized skols will be closed. they have not said how many schools are expected to close but opponents say they unfairly target minorities. >>> 24 and counting for the miami heat. but it was not easy. it hasn't been easy the last few games. lebron james and company came back from 27 points down in the third. >> can you believe that? >> beat his old team, the cleveland cavaliers 98-95. a triple-double. 12 boards, 10 assists. the heat are now within nine games of the nba record for consecutive wins held by the '71-'72 los angeles lakers. >> do you think they'll do it? >> no. they almost blew it against the celtics, almost blew it against the cavs. they are the best team i've seen in years. i don't think they should ever lose necessarily but that's a lot of games to win in a row. >> i can't believe they were down that much and came back. >> i can't believe you can do that every night. >> i think they're doing it on purpose. >>> recovered
project 1 billion dollar deficit next year. the closures will save chicago $560 million the next decade. >> whether you do this, mike, in chamucla, florida, or chicago, illinois, this is always excruciating tough for parents and kids, but you got to do it if you're going to keep the budget. >> you have to do it to same some semblance of sanity for a big city like that but you get into where are the displaced kids going to go to schools when the schools are closed? are they going to be bussed? most parents would like their kids to go to a neighborhood school and what happens then? that a huge burden for the mayor now. >> totally. sequestration is complicating it even more. we just did a report that head start across the country is facing these exact challenges and cutting school days and not accepting kids and randomly dropping kids from the program and a disadvantage for kids in that economic status. >> you look at the regional and local papers across the country you see endless stories like this. you look at the national programs and turn on the tv news and where is the white house tou
should be used to tackle the deficit and invest in the middle class, not be used just to simply tax, cut tax rates for the rich the way that the house budget did. >> reporter: now the senate did not accept the paul ryan house budget. the patty murray budget, the senate plan will probably come up to a vote 2:00 a.m. or so. uma: 2:00 a.m. regardless how votes will go won't there be need for serious negotiations? >> reporter: no question about that the house has a very different version than the senate. the house said they would balance the budget without raising taxes. the senate is doing more spending, more taxes. so our colleague greta van susteren asked house budget chair paul ryan about next steps. >> house passed the budget. the senate is passing a budget first time we've seen that in four years. that's a good thing. the question is now can we start looking for common ground? can we started a advancing toward a compromise? the way we look at this as house republicans. we understand our budget probably won't become law in every great detail but hopefully we get a down payment on this p
is it doesn't really look like a whole lot. surely not enough to fill our deficit at this point but it is going to bring back the cooler temperatures in the overnight hours with the cloud cover. we will actually see our 0 overnight lows and our morning temperatures come up. low 40s in the forecast tuesday, wednesday, thursday. unsettled weather wednesday and thursday with a bigger storm moving in for the weekend. this second system, or third system i guess we could call it, could bring us scattered showers for saturday and sunday. >>> on tuesday night the sacramento city counsel will consider throwing up a last- second shot to keep the kings from leaving town. the city has struck a daily to build a new $448 million downtown arena, and it would be the largest redevelopment project in sacramento history with up to a million and a half square feet of offices housing shops and a hotel. the city would pay $258 million with most of the money coming from the sale of bonds supported by parking revenues. >> that's part of revitalizing our downtown. that's part of completing the rest of k
. they will take middle-class money. they will take everybody's money in order to pay off the deficit. it's something you have to think about. >> brian: there was a report from somebody in great britain, an authority of some sort who was talking about, given what has happened in sigh plus, if i had money in spain i would get it out. >> no, it's being talked about in other places. in worse of terms of condition, spain is a good one, greece and lots of other places and they are talking about it. you know, at some point maybe they start talking here. what ultimately that means is that jobs will -- you think we have bad unemployment now. you will see unemployment like you've never seen it before. >> gretchen: somebody from your show, celebrity apprentice, a lot of people will be shocked they didn't see it. amarosa and claudia got the hook >> why didn't she bring amarosa back? in all fairness claudia, i have to defend you. if she was brought back it wouldn't matter. you were the project manager and you failed. you have a great future. i'm sorry -- you're fired! >> did you for a second i can't
. here is the next question. is reducing the federal deficit a worthy goal in and of itself? and 85% say yes. 11% say no. it's not just john boehner who said it's not an immediate problem. paul ryan, the face of fiscal responsibility himself this past weekend on one of the sunday shows said not an immediate problem. so americans have gotten the message that it is a problem and that we should be tackling it right now, even though our lawmakers feel it can be down the road a year, five years, whatever we tackle it. >> brian: our next guest has nothing to at to this subject. so i'll move on. >> steve: he does. he's going to -- >> brian: he's coming out of his chair. solar companies were supposed to boost our economy. now evidence they might be tanking our economy. you remember solyndra that cost american taxpayers more than $500 million. turns out it may have a successor. >> steve: months after opening, the oregon based solar panel company, solo power, is facing layoffs, putting 250 million of our taxpayer dollars in jeopardy. apparently stuart varney, we learned nothing from solyndra. >> n
. that's how many chicago schools will be closed because a $1 billion budget deficit. it's not clear how many teachers are lose their jobs, but they will close a bunch of schools. 43,000. that's how many jobs have been lost since j.c. penney -- at j.c. penney since ron johnson became ceo. a new report shows he let the company pay for at least nine executives to get work by two jets, which cost $41 million apiece. nice work if you can get it. mr. kilmeade? >> brian: or if you had it. it's one of the most outrageous stories of the week. one of the most popular pharmacies telling their employees to step on the scale or pay a penalty. cvs wants employees to report their weight, fat and glucose levels to health insurance bosses and if they don't, they get fined $600 a year. it might be legal, but is it fair? steven mitchell is an employment attorney and author of a book, "the employee rights handbook." and john is a professor at a law school. does this sound right to you? >> it's an outrage n my opinion. they're trying to help people's health, but when you impose a penalty on people, that's w
to close the 54 schools in an effort to make a dent in a $1 billion budget deficit, make better use of resources and improve overall education here in the nation's third largest school district. >> i don't think it's going to be good for my kids. >> reporter: the news of the school closings continues to ripple across chicago this morning. >> i'm, just don't know where they're going to go. >> reporter: mayor rahm emmanuel says the closures are necessary after too much money was being spent on maintaining underutilized school buildings saying "by consolidating these schools, chicago public schools can focus on safely getting every child into a better performing school. like school systems in new york and philadelphia, where schools are being closed, chicago must make tough choices." a number of teachers may lose their jobs as a result of the closings. karen lewis. of the teachers' union lashed out at emmanuel. >> our mayor, who is away on a ski trip, drops this information right before spring break. it's the ultimate bullying job. mayor rahm emmanuel should be ashamed of himself. >> r
of a communication ability to translate that is a significant deficit. for highly uncommon events such as an asteroid fly-by, there's simply no established communication mechanism. i believe our flight operations team learned of da-14 when they received a courtesy call from a colleague at the aerospace corporation. last year the commercial satellite industry participated in dod's war games designed to exercise dod thinking about the deployment of its terrestrial and space assets in response to a conflict situation. last year those games concluded, as they have several times in the past, that dod relies on commercial satellite companies -- their reliance is considerable and that a crisis is the wrong time to try to establish clear lines of communication with your major partners and suppliers. i suspect the same conclusion can be safely applied to the topics that we're discussing today. while governments were first to send satellites to near-earth space, commercial enterprise will be the primary use of the orbital arc in the 21st century. government and space operators need to take a more collaborative
of the problem that we're in as a country in terms of our debt and deficits, we have to have programs that have metrics on them, they have to be followed up, the grants have to be followed, and they need to be held to account. so i hope my colleagues -- i have no hopes of this passing, because most of the colleagues won't actually look at the research that's been done on this, won't look at the effectiveness of it, won't look at the waste, and they'll vote a party-line vote to defeat this amendment. we'll get 45 or 50 votes or 51 or 52. but it'll go down and so consequently real problems that have been oversighted by the permanent subcommittee on investigation, really oversighted by the department of homeland security, the real solutions to problems won't happen because of the way this place is being run. i'd next like to talk about amendment 93. amendment 93 follows a recommendation of the president -- not my recommend day, the president's recommendation. and what this amendment would do is actually take money that has been directed for expired heritage area authorizations that weren't any rec
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